Courses Description 2022-23

Courses Short Description

Contents

Semester 1

English Ι

The course includes: a review of grammar (tense system, modals, etc., basic syntactic structures of the English language etc.); further development of the students’ vocabulary and language skills through exposure to relatively simple oral and written discourse of limited length with an emphasis on themes related to the students’ field of studies (Politics, Liberalism, Conservativism, Socialism, Nationalism, Feminism, Ecologism); expansion of the students’ world knowledge and academic subject-specific knowledge; enhancement of the students’ meta-cognitive and study skills. Throughout the module, extensive use is made of e-class and the Internet. A variety of learning materials, tools and modes is offered in order to match and satisfy individual learning styles and needs. Students are also requested to read one literary book of their or the course instructor’s choice

Diplomatic History, 1815-1991

The course analyzes the major diplomatic events from the end of the Napoleonic Wars to the end of the Cold War. The starting point is the Congress of Vienna, the decisions of which determined the physiognomy of the European balance of power system for a century. Special mention is made of multilateral diplomacy during the 19th century, which took the form of convening international Conferences to resolve major political issues. The foreign policy of the Great Powers, their rivalries and alliances, as well as the emergence of new Powers which were gradually added to the existing ones, are also analyzed. Next, the causes, the development, and results of the First World War are investigated. The interwar international system is outlined and the reasons why it collapsed, resulting in the start of World War II. A separate field of reference is the diplomatic events during the Second World War. Finally, the characteristic features, crises, and recession periods of the Cold War are presented.

Introduction to International Politics

The course studies the interaction among state and non-state actors in the international environment. Its objective is to introduce the students to the main features of the international system as well as familiarize them with the core concepts and research tools of the discipline of international relations. Moreover, the course acquaints the students with the most important issues featuring in the world agenda, namely, the struggle against poverty and underdevelopment, the protection of human rights, the spread of democracy, and the fight against terrorism. Altogether, the course prepares the students for the needs of the Spring term course on International Relations.

Introduction to Political Science

For the purposes of this course, Political Science is defined in a broad sense, including the study of power and the state, as well as the study of phenomena that have political dimensions and perform a political function. The aim of the course is the acquaintance with the sources, the basic concepts, theories and methodological tools by which Political Science tries to conceive and interpret the different forms of the political phenomenon and the demonstration of its pluralistic character. Thus, it will serve as a basis for more advanced courses.

Law: An Introduction

The course subject is the analysis of the necessary concepts that will lead to the understanding of the basic elements of legal science. In particular, the concepts of law, rule of law, categorisation and division of law, and sources of law are described. Furthermore, some basic concepts of constitutional law are analysed, such as the nature of the government system, the separation of powers, state organization and individual rights, as well as the description of the organization of the courts in Greece. Following that, the notions of administrative law are analysed, such as administrative act, administrative organ and protection of the civilian. Then reference is made to basic concepts of criminal law (crime, wrongdoing, liability, negligence, punishment) and civil law (subjects of law, right, claim, contract, guilt, liability, compensation, late payment, sell and purchase, lease, company and contract of employment). Also, notions of property law, family law and inheritance law are also mentioned. The course ends with reference to basic concepts of commercial law, and labour law.
Upon successful completion of the course the students will be able to:
– understand the basic concepts of the law as described above and grasp a comprehensive knowledge of everyday practical issues in their personal and professional life;
– to compare, analyse and use these concepts in relation to subjects which will be thoroughly examined in courses of subsequent semesters (eg, State Organization),
-to explore and write short reports or work on them.

Research and Methods in Social Sciences

The course serves as an introduction to first-year students to methods in social sciences. Research and Methods in Social Sciences seeks to introduce new-comer, first-year students to the ways research is conducted and knowledge is produced in social sciences. In addition to outlining the fundamentals of qualitative methods, it discusses several aspects of the philosophy of social sciences. Also, it tries to act as a practical, instruction guide to social science research and writing: study of literature, constructing the framework for analysis, data compilation, testing of hypotheses or arguments, scrutiny of findings, and proposals for further research.

Semester 2

English ΙΙ

Through the course the students are taught advanced grammatical and syntactic structures and vocabulary and are exposed to oral and written discourse of advanced length and difficulty with an emphasis on themes related to the students’ field of studies (Political Studies and International Relations). Emphasis is also placed on the development of the students’ meta-cognitive and study skills. A variety of learning materials, tools and modes is offered in order to match and satisfy individual learning styles and needs. Throughout the module, extensive use is made of e-class and the Internet. In addition, students are requested to read one literary book for which supportive material is provided by the instructor.

International Relations

International Relations is the field of social sciences that examines the dynamics and practice of world politics in the past and present in a theoretically informed way. In essence, it is a discipline that studies thoroughly the phenomenon of war and peace in space and time focusing on the relations developed between state and non-state actors in areas of human activity that go through and across borders, territories and regions. From this angle, the course provides an overview of the history and development of the discipline of international relations great debates and major schools of thought while discussing relevant methodological issues, along with aspects of the philosophy of social sciences.

Introduction to Sociology

In this course, a first acquaintance with the science of sociology in general, with the branch of political sociology in particular, is attempted. Sociology is the scientific study of social phenomena, i.e. the social practices and relationships through which individuals organize and give meaning to their collective lives. In the light of the basic concepts of sociology, the study of the political phenomenon as a distinct social practice is also attempted.

Greek Diplomatic History

The course examines the formation and evolution of Greek foreign policy from the establishment of the Greek state to Greece’s accession to the EEC. The starting point is the diplomatic developments related to the recognition of Greek independence. Special reference is made to the way in which the demand for territorial expansion (which took the form of the Great Idea) determined the diplomatic orientations of Greece for most of the 19th and until the beginning of the 20th century. The diplomatic components of Greece’s ten-year war expedition during the period 1912-1922 are also analyzed. The key role of the Asia Minor Disaster and the signing of the Lausanne Peace Treaty for the fundamental restructuring of Greek foreign policy, which, in its new form, began to be implemented in the interwar period, is highlighted. Greece’s participation in the Second World War as well as its membership in the Western coalition during the Cold War are also outlined. The developments surrounding the Cyprus issue and their effects on Greek-Turkish relations are presented, as well as the negative impact that the dictatorship of the colonels had on the Cyprus issue, but also on Greek foreign policy as a whole. Finally, the new diplomatic program adopted after the restoration of democracy in the summer of 1974 is presented, an organic element of which was the pursuit (and ultimately the achievement) of joining the EEC.

Political Theory

The course investigates aspects of modern political theory from the 16th to the 19th centuries. Its aim is twofold: (a) the acquaintance with some of the most influential political ideas and arguments of the modern era in connection with the intellectual context in which they took place and (b) the study of primary texts as an indispensable source of knowledge and as a means to cultivate critical thinking.

Constitutional Law

The course includes basic concepts of a general theory of Constitutional Law, polity issues, as well as the sources of Greek Constitutional Law. The choice of issues analyzed enhances the Politics student’s understanding of law rules affecting Greek politics. Teaching rests on a combination of theoretical analysis and their application. The course includes the basic concepts and the elements of general theory of Constitutional Law, elements of politology, as well as the sources of the Greek Constitutional Law. The choice of the particular subjects to be analyzed seeks to meet the need of a political scientist to approach the meaning of the rules of the law which regulate Greek political life. The teaching of the course provides a combination of theoretical analysis and application of these rules. The aim of the course is the familiarization with the fundamental concepts, the main methodological conclusions of Constitutional Law.

Semester 3

International Law

The International Law regulates several aspects of social behavior. It is not limited, as in the past, in the inter-state relations and pervades major segments of internal law. The major objects of regulations concern the pacific solution of international conflicts and the avoidance of violence, the protection of human dignity and the international cooperation in every field. The rules of International Law refer to the internal as well as to the international protection of human rights and to the international economic relations. Dealing with international law involves not only governments, international organizations, international institutions and international institutions of the state as well as simple citizens, as well as those whose intention is the creation of an international civil society. The aim of the course is the familiarization with the fundamental concepts, the main methodological proceedings and the basic conclusions of Public International Law.

Diplomacy and International Organization

The course offers a comprehensive introduction to the methods of diplomacy, as well as to the institutional organization of the international system. The course aims at making students familiar with the most important theoretical and practical aspects of diplomatic practice, as well as the role of international organizations in the international setting, with emphasis on issues such as peace and security, international economic relations etc. In this framework, through the use of practical examples, the course presents the ways diplomatic relations are developed among states, as well as the ways diplomatic negotiations are carried out, both at the bilateral and the multilateral level. Moreover, the typology, the structure and the aims of international organizations are analyzed, with emphasis on the functioning of organizations such as the League of Nations, the United Nations, the World Trade Organization, NATO etc.

Introduction to Economics

This course familiarizes students with basic notions and terminology of economic theory. In particular, in the context of microeconomics, it examines the concept of the market and supply/demand, of competition, oligopoly and monopoly, as well as some aspects of cost-benefit analysis and game theory. It also introduces some major concepts and terminology of macroeconomics such as GDP, inflation, unemployment, growth, fiscal vs. monetary policy, and exports-imports-balance of trade.

Conflict and Security in World Politics

Drawing on theoretical debates and discussion developed in the first-year course on International Relations, this course focuses on two analytical categories, that is, conflict and security, which matter a great deal to making sense of world politics. Conflict and security are taken to result from the driving forces of competition and cooperation in the anarchical international society, which in turn determine the evolution of peace and war. Within this theoretical framework, the course seeks to discuss conflict and security in the view of: a) the traditional and contemporary IR theories, b) the part that state and non-state agents play in determining their evolution, and c) the experience of practice, and of the challenges of the future.

Economic Development and International Development Cooperation

The course acquaints students with basic concepts of development economics. It presents growth indicators, such as GDP and others, the issue of balanced and unbalanced growth and delves into poverty and inequality. At the same time, it aims to familiarize students with the concept, content and practices of international development cooperation policies. Some of the topics discussed are: how is economic development achieved? What is the difference between economic growth and economic development? Is international development assistance solely a mechanism for providing assistance to those in need, without necessarily serving political purposes? In the course students can choose to join a team responsible of writing a proposal in the context of development aid calls from the European Commission, taking the role of an NGO or a consulting company and become familiar with the relevant procedures and mechanisms.

Comparative Politics

Comparative politics is the study of the most important political similarities and differences between/among political entities (countries, institutions, etc). Comparative politics is first and foremost a method to study a variety of political phenomena, becoming comparative government (if it studies government), comparative electoral studies (if it studies electoral systems), comparative foreign policy (if it studies foreign policy) etc. The course aims to familiarize students with the fundamental concepts, analytical methods and basic conclusions of comparative politics. It also aims to prepare students for courses of the two final years of study in both Political Science and International Relations (particularly Area Studies).

Semester 4

International Political Economy

The aim of the course is to familiarize students with a new field in international (economic) relations, the International Political Economy (IPE). It has now become commonly understood that the study of comprehensive issues such as the international economic and political relations, the international financial system, development and underdevelopment, and North-South interdependence, requires a holistic, multidisciplinary approach. Politics and economics, internal and external affairs, are part of the same whole through which we assess and understand the complex reality. At first, we analyze the basic theoretical approaches in International Political Economy. Secondly, we assess special issues of IPE with emphasis on the formulation and the outcomes of the international financial, economic and political system and structures from the Second World War onwards.

Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis

The aim of the course is to cultivate the “empirical” analytical thought. It concerns the development of knowledge and competitions aiming the description and the understanding of complex or less complex social phenomena through information and data.
Meeting the demands of the course, students will be able to synthesize and proceed into integrated analyses on issues of social, economic or political interest. Students will learn how to:
-trace, recuperate and process quantitative and qualitative public data on issues of social, economic or political character
-choose from an array of analytical techniques and apply them to the exploration of issues of social, economic or political character,
-interpret and further present in a creative way the results of their analyses through the use of advanced representations and formalized references
The course is based upon the three axes: data-information-knowledge, that is, upon the way knowledge is built: from data to information and from information to knowledge.

European Integration

The course focuses on the institutional and political organization of the EU, with reference to the Treaties of Maastricht, Amsterdam, Nice and Lisbon. It analyzes the main theoretical approaches to European integration: functionalism and neo-functionalism, intergovernmentalism and the supra-national model, the goals and weaknesses of those models in determining teleologically the future of a united Europe. Furthermore, it examines the role of the European institutions such as the Commission, the Council of Ministers, the European Parliament, the Court of Justice and the main processes and policies, with particular emphasis on the Common Foreign and Security Policy.

Theories of Culture

The course examines modern cultural theories with reference to the most important periods of cultural thought in the 20th century. The course underlines, through the study of texts and other cultural products, the interdisciplinary character of cultural thought – the interaction of cultural studies with political science, social anthropology, comparative literature, sociology and feminist studies. The aim of this course is to familiarize students with the basic cultural concepts and with the works of the most widely recognized western thinkers at the fields of cultural studies, feminist thought and comparative imagology.

Political Leadership

The course aims at approaching the phenomenon of leadership especially within the framework of a democratic political system. It assesses principal theories, values and features of leadership, models of leadership in the fields of society and the economy, the significance of leadership to the functioning of political and social institutions and the importance of gender. Moreover, leadership is seen with regard to decision-making with emphasis on the values and principles of public interest, as well as on the structures, functions and the overall regulatory framework of modern governance that influence the quality of decision-making.

Political Philosophy

The course investigates the principles of justice involved in the legitimization of the various political regimes. It studies the major theories of social justice, focusing on the principles of contractual justice and of utility, with emphasis given to their critique by the liberal theories of justice and by marxist, feminist and communitarian lines of thought. The course also attempts to highlight the break between the modern and pre-modern conceptions, among which the platonic principle of functional reciprocity, and the aristotelian principle of geometrical equality.

Semester 5 – Specialization: Political Science

International Law

The International Law regulates several aspects of social behavior. It is not limited, as in the past, in the inter-state relations and pervades major segments of internal law. The major objects of regulations concern the pacific solution of international conflicts and the avoidance of violence, the protection of human dignity and the international cooperation in every field. The rules of International Law refer to the internal as well as to the international protection of human rights and to the international economic relations. Dealing with international law involves not only governments, international organizations, international institutions and international institutions of the state as well as simple citizens, as well as those whose intention is the creation of an international civil society. The aim of the course is the familiarization with the fundamental concepts, the main methodological proceedings and the basic conclusions of Public International Law.

European Union Law

The course provides a thorough examination of EC/EU institutions and their significance for European citizens. Following a historical overview of European integration up to the present, the course goes on to examine: a) the EU/EC legal nature and mission, b) EU/EC Institutions (Council, Commission, European Parliament, European Court of Justice), c) Acts adopted by European institutions, d) the judicial protection system, and e) citizen rights according to the European Court of Justice in case of a member state’s violation of community law (direct effect, the supremacy of EU over national law, indirect effect, right of compensation).

Democracy: History, Theory, Contemporary Challenges

The course comprises three interrelated units: in the first it examines a selection of important «moments» of Democracy qua ideal or/and regime, such as the moment of classical Athens and its «re-invention» in the XVIIIth century. In the second unit it examines some models of democracy, mainly from a theoretical point of view, such as the model of participative Democracy, of deliberative Democracy, agonistic Democracy, as well as the model of the economic theory of Democracy. In the third unit, it examines the state of « malaise » or crisis observed in contemporary democracies and the challenges they have to meet, such as the problems of democratic control, legitimization and account ability which issue from the reduction of the power of national representative institutions and the fragmented character of world governance, the tendancies of the rise of populism and extremism, the relation of the tension between technocracy and popular sovereignty etc. Students are expected, through the combination of knowledge acquired in other courses, to penetrate the phenomenon of democracy, to grasp significant dimensions of its variety and historicity, as well as to engage in a questioning concerning contemporary related issues.

Public Administration and Public Management

The scope of the course is the comparative presentation and analysis of the contemporary models of public sector management. At a first level, course presents the historical evolution of public administration theory and practice. Following the analysis of the theoretical framework of public administration, course analyses the evolution and the reform of the contemporary models of public administration, focusing on the governance and performance issues. At the last part of the course, the basic principles and the models of organizational design and management in the public sector are presented, as well as the current issues on pubic management reform.

Greek Political System

The course deals with the construction and development of the Greek political system from the perspective of political science. Some of its major themes include the functioning of fundamental political institutions, democratization, state-society relations, the party system, political ideologies, the impact of socio-economic factors, modernization and Europeanization. Major historical events for the political system are investigated, such as the beginnings of state formation, the civil war, democratic consolidation and adherence to the EC. Moreover, important aspects of the quality of the democratic process are critically approached

Semester 5 – Specialization: International Relations

International Law

The International Law regulates several aspects of social behavior. It is not limited, as in the past, in the inter-state relations and pervades major segments of internal law. The major objects of regulations concern the pacific solution of international conflicts and the avoidance of violence, the protection of human dignity and the international cooperation in every field. The rules of International Law refer to the internal as well as to the international protection of human rights and to the international economic relations. Dealing with international law involves not only governments, international organizations, international institutions and international institutions of the state as well as simple citizens, as well as those whose intention is the creation of an international civil society. The aim of the course is the familiarization with the fundamental concepts, the main methodological proceedings and the basic conclusions of Public International Law.

European Union Law

The course provides a thorough examination of EC/EU institutions and their significance for European citizens. Following a historical overview of European integration up to the present, the course goes on to examine: a) the EU/EC legal nature and mission, b) EU/EC Institutions (Council, Commission, European Parliament, European Court of Justice), c) Acts adopted by European institutions, d) the judicial protection system, and e) citizen rights according to the European Court of Justice in case of a member state’s violation of community law (direct effect, the supremacy of EU over national law, indirect effect, right of compensation).

Foreign Policy Analysis

The course studies decisions and actions of state and non-state actors that aim at influencing their external environment. It introduces students to the complexity of the foreign decision-making process and discusses the main domestic and international factors that affect the exercise of foreign policy. Some of the questions that are dealt with in the courses are the following: How are decisions of foreign policy taken? What is the role of individuals in the process? How do the personality and the beliefs of decision-makers affect their actions? Which factors usually lead to wrong decisions in foreign policy?

Introduction to Geopolitics

Geopolitics is the branch of International Relations which seeks to understand, explain, and predict international political behavior by using geographical variables. Typical geographical variables are the location, size, climate, demography and natural resources The course examines the history of geopolitical thought from the German geographers of the 19th century and Halford Mackinder’s ‘heartland theory’ to French geopolitical thought that attempted to ‘de-nationalize’ geopolitics, and contemporary critical geopolitics that emphasize geographical discourses and study geographical imagination. Much attention is paid to the influence of geopolitical ideas on policy-making.

Strategic Studies

Strategic Studies is the field of the discipline of international relations that explores, focusing on human action and power, how the relation of means to the ends of policy plays its part in shaping occurrences, trends and transformations in world politics. It is substantially a subject that, cutting across such subjects of the discipline as security and defence studies, geopolitics, crisis management, conflict resolution and foreign policy analysis, is formulated through and by the interdisciplinary dialogue engagement of International Relations with History, Political Science and Sociology. It is from this perspective that drawing attention to violence and its main component, military force, sets the thread of the problematique over the phenomenon of war and peace. Equipped with this framework of analysis, the course sheds light on the history of strategic thought to make the conceptual and theoretical fundamentals of strategic studies familiar to students.

Semester 6 – Specialization: Political Science

Political Systems and Parties in Contemporary Europe

The course assesses the role and features of political parties and party systems as regards the functions of democratic representation, the exercise of political power and its democratic control. Its major themes concern democratic consolidation, political culture, typologies of party systems, political ideologies, the role of parties in the functioning of parliamentary institutions and executive bodies. Moreover, emphasis is given to the influence of social factors and historical events on the formation of particular cleavages – and correspondingly, to the rise or fall of particular parties – and on the ‘crisis of representation’ that some developed democracies are faced with.

Religion and Politics

This course aims to examine the role of religion in contemporary international politics, emphasizing the phenomenon of religious fundamentalism. The world’s major religions (Christianity, Islam, Judaism, and Buddhism) are analyzed through this prism, in terms of their influence on political perceptions, attitudes and ideologies. It also studies particular issues, such as the clash of civilizations, respect for human rights, and new religious movements. Finally, it explores contemporary state-church relations and the contradictory role of religion in international relations and policy formulation in the US and Europe.

State and Civil Society

The course approaches the relations of State and Society through MichaelWalzer’s concept of “spheres of justice” and the distinct principles of distribution of social goods that regulate the spheres of membership, office, welfare, market, religion, education, family, political power. Within this conceptual framework the course strives to elucidate the historical phenomenon of the modern State and the concomitant process of the emergence of an autonomous “Civil Society”.

Public Policy Analysis

The scope of the course is to present, and comparative analyze the different steps and tools of public policy design and implementation. In this context, the theoretical background, the historical evolution and the wider social, political and economic factors determined public policy theory and practice are presented. Following the course analyzes, the stages of public policy design and formulation, the basic models and tools of public policy implementation, the decision-making matrix, as well as the critical issues of the evaluation of public policy impact on the society and the economy.

Decision Modelling and Information Systems

Decision modelling and information systems is an introductory course into the realm of quantitative models that are used for decision making. In particular students are are introduced to descriptive, normative and prescriptive decision making models, such as linear programming, simulation and decision analysis. Emphasis is given in the use of software tools that simplify the development and of use of these models as instruments, in a way that resembles a black-box approach. During the length of the course students cultivate software skills and skills in abstracting real world problems as decision models.

Semester 6 – Specialization: International Relations

Political Parties and Systems in Contemporary Europe

The course assesses the role and features of political parties and party systems as regards the functions of democratic representation, the exercise of political power and its democratic control. Its major themes concern democratic consolidation, political culture, typologies of party systems, political ideologies, the role of parties in the functioning of parliamentary institutions and executive bodies. Moreover, emphasis is given to the influence of social factors and historical events on the formation of particular cleavages – and correspondingly, to the rise or fall of particular parties – and on the ‘crisis of representation’ that some developed democracies are faced with.

East Asia: politics, economy and international relations

Nowadays, a ‘power shift’ is taking place in the global political economy from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean owing to the rapid growth of China (and in the recent past of neighboring Japan). While economic interdependence and regional co-operation (see for instance the establishment of ASEAN) are intense in Eastern Asia, conflicts for natural resources (e.g. Sea of South China), and territorial disputes (e.g. between China and Japan and between China and Taiwan) are not absent from the region. Not surprisingly, the EU has been increasingly turning its attention to Eastern Asia and is currently emerging in to an important economic partner of the region’s countries. The course analyzes the political-economic and social dynamics of Eastern Asia and assesses the impact of the EU policies towards the region.

Greek-Turkish Relations

The course analyzes relations between Greek and Turkey from the Treaty of Lausanne to the present day. In this framework, special emphasis is given on the content and importance of the Treaty of Lausanne per se. Moreover, the reasons the led to the Greek-Turkish rapprochement in the 1930s and in the first years after the Second World War re explained. The course, also highlights the importance that the Cyprus question played in the historical development of Greek-Turkish relations ever since the mid-1950s, including the Turkish invasion of Cyprus in 1974. Last but not least, Greek-Turkish relations after 1974 and the problems related with them are thoroughly examined.

Macroeconomic Policy

The course “Basic Principles of Macroeconomic Policy” is designed to help the students understand thoroughly the behavior of the economy as a whole. To study the overall performance of the economy, the course gives particular emphasis on economic policies and policy variables that affect that performance – on monetary and fiscal policies, the money stock and interest rates, the public debt, the budget and the public deficits, the balance of payments and the determination of income in an open economy.

Semester 7 – Specialization: Political Science

Nations and Nationalism

In both political science and international relations, the understanding of the ideology of nationalism as well as the emergence, nature and legitimacy of contemporary nation-states is of crucial importance. Without an interpretation of the dynamics of these phenomena, political issues ranging from sovereignty to power relationships and from regional co-operation to violent conflicts (inter or intra-state) become completely incomprehensible. The course is an introduction to nationalism, focusing especially but not exclusively on the European experience. It aims to familiarize students with all theoretical paradigms of nationalism and also to evaluate their explanatory power with references to a number of case–studies. Particular emphasis is also given to the consequences of nationalism, both positive (democracy and capitalism) and negative (stereotypes, feelings of superiority etc.).

Public Administration in Greece

The scope of the course is to provide a comprehensive analysis of the historical evolution and performance of public administration in Greece. Starting with the historical evolution and formulation of the national administrative model, the course analyzes the wider socio-political environment of public administration performance in Greece and the factors that contributed to its organization and the distribution of the competencies for public services provision between the public agencies. Furthermore, the course is presenting the organization of public Greek public administration at central, regional and local level, the issues and problems of public services provision, as challenges for the reform of the national administrative system.

Political Communication and Mass Media

The course studies the ideological and practical influence of various mass media (the press, cinema, television, internet etc) on the formation of public opinion. Particular emphasis is given to their influence on contemporary political behavior, the management of political power, communication strategies of parties, governments, organizations, economic and social institutions. Attention is also paid to the influence of public opinion on the agenda and ideological preferences of mass media. Empirical cases are combined with relevant theoretical analysis of fundamental notions in philosophy and communication. The course offers an introduction to the mechanisms of communication activities in the field of politics through practices, such as planning and management of electoral campaign, the use of political resources and mass media and the analysis of public opinion polls.

Semester 7 – Specialization: International Relations

Nations and Nationalism

In both political science and international relations, the understanding of the ideology of nationalism as well as the emergence, nature and legitimacy of contemporary nation-states is of crucial importance. Without an interpretation of the dynamics of these phenomena, political issues ranging from sovereignty to power relationships and from regional co-operation to violent conflicts (inter or intra-state) become completely incomprehensible. The course is an introduction to nationalism, focusing especially but not exclusively on the European experience. It aims to familiarize students with all theoretical paradigms of nationalism and also to evaluate their explanatory power with references to a number of case–studies. Particular emphasis is also given to the consequences of nationalism, both positive (democracy and capitalism) and negative (stereotypes, feelings of superiority etc.).

International Economic Relations

This course introduces students to basic theories that explain international trade relations, the international monetary system and financial market operations. The section of international trade will cover the basic theories of trade, the export-oriented growth strategy as well as the political economy of trade policy. Moreover, the role of foreign direct investment and of the multinational companies will be discussed. Monetary aspects of the international economy are the subject of the second section. After a short presentation of the history of the international monetary system, the workings of the foreign exchange market will be analyzed. Moreover, issues like the rationale behind and effects of different exchange-rate policy regimes, the underlying reasons for international financial crises, the interplay between international and domestic macroeconomic forces in the adjustment of the Balance of Payments, will be discussed in this section.

Russia in Global Politics and Economy

This course examines the place of post-Soviet Russia in world economy and international politics. The course focuses on Russia’s foreign policy schools, its characteristics as an “emerging power”, Russia’s international economic relations and energy policy, as well as its role on important issues on the contemporary international agenda. The purpose of the course is to enable students to understand how Russia interacts with other actors in international politics and what factors determine its international choices. Emphasis is placed on the international context of Russian policy-making and on the hard and soft power elements that Russia puts forward today, highlighting the country’s role in the international distribution of power and wealth.

Regional Security in the Middle East

The course explores international relations and security in the region of the Middle East. In particular, it presents the history of intractable conflicts (e.g., the Arab-Israeli conflict), their causes and prospects for peaceful resolution. It also examines the rise of radical Islam, the issue of terrorism, the role of minorities in the region, the clash between Shia and Sunni Muslims, Iran’s regional role, nuclear proliferation, and US, EU and Russian policies in the Middle East.

Semester 8 – Specialization: Political Science

Politics and Violence

The course presents the theories of political violence and its contemporary assumptions about conflicts within states. Special mention is made of contemporary phenomena of social and political rebellion, transnational as well as state violence. Additionally, the phenomenon of the action of terrorist organizations of political violence from the end of the 1960s to the present day and in particular the evolution of the phenomenon of political violence in the 21st century is examined. Additionally, the phenomenon of the action of terrorist organizations of political violence from the end of the 1960s to the present day and in particular the evolution of the phenomenon of political violence in the 21st century is examined.

Elections, Electoral Systems and Electoral Behavior

The aim of the course is to investigate and analyse voting behaviour and the parameters that determine it and decisively influence the choice of voters in the elections. In this context, students learn the basic explanatory models of electoral sociology: electoral geography, political ecology, behavioral approaches developed by the Columbia and Michigan Schools, rational choice, and the macro-sociological model. Other topics with which students will become familiar include the relationship between voter and party identification and the causes of the major changes in voting behavior in recent elections in Greece and elsewhere. The course also aims to analyze electoral systems and their impact on voting behavior and the party system. Students carry out learning activities (small-scale exercises) developing skills and abilities in the use of writing, gathering and prioritizing data from various sources, both print and electronic. They are also tested during the teaching period in progress tests.

Regional and Local Government

The purpose of this course is to present a comparative evaluation of the different models of Regional and Local Government organization at international level, focusing on the case of Local government in Greece. In this context, the theoretical framework and the different models of local government organization in the European Union are compared, in order to evaluate their implementation and performance and identify the common trends towards their reform. Having presented the wider environment, the theoretical framework and the contemporary models of Regional and Local Government organization, is presented at the second part of the course the historical evolution, the institutional framework, the organizational design and the performance the local government in Greece are critically analyzed.

Political Ideologies

This course strives to offer a map with the major ideologies – Liberalism, Conservatism, Nationalism, Anarchism, Fascism- National Socialism -, and also more contemporary movements like Feminism and versions of religious fundamentalism as well as populism seen as “a thin-centred” ideologies . In the last lectures the course attempts to familiarize the ideological analysis with a selective reference to conceptual approaches, and also through discourse analysis. Students are expected on the one hand to construct a fundamental body of knowledge relative to the more important ideological currents, and on the other hand to form a critical ability of recognizing and appreciating ideological patterns as they unfold in contemporary political discourse.

Semester 8 – Specialization: International Relations

Emerging Powers and Global Governance

The course examines ongoing developments in the international political and economic stage with regard to the emergence of new states, such as Brazil India and China. It focuses on the ways by which a range of emerging states have managed to substantially strengthen their positions at the world stage, thereby leading to a de facto re-organization of the system of global governance. It puts emphasis on the economic and political choices of these states during the last decades as well as the global environment that facilitated their emergence. The scope of the course is students’ understanding of the factors that account for the fact that emergent powers have become important actors in the world system. Moreover, the role of economic crises at the international level, the regional choices of the aforementioned states and their results as well as the ways by which international organizations and institutions are being transformed as a result of these phenomena.

Africa: Politics, Economy and International Relations

Relations between the European Union and Sub-Saharan Africa are deep and complex. The EU is by far the African continent’s main trade partner and its main source of development assistance, while several all-encompassing agreements have created a sense of a common space that some commentators have defined as ‘Eurafrica’. In recent years there has been extensive diplomatic activity. A variety of new agreements and ambitious declarations have created a growing sense of an ever closer and more balanced relationship. In particular, trade relations between Europe and Africa are in the process of being reformulated.

Regional Security in South Eastern Europe

The course discusses the intermingled web of security issues that have tormented South Eastern Europe since the end of the Cold War. Its main objective is to analyze the ramifications of Yugoslavia’s disintegration and to acquaint students with the policies, concerns and threat perceptions of the region’s countries. The course also evaluates international efforts to manage the conflicts in South Eastern Europe and the several processes and initiatives for regional cooperation that have at times been developed (e.g. Royaumont Process, SECI, SEECP and Regional Cooperation Council). Finally, it analyses the effort of all countries from the region to become full members of the Euro-Atlantic security structures.

Political and Economic Relationships in the Black Sea and the Caucasus

The course focuses on the structures and processes that shape up international political and economic relations in the wider Black Sea region including the South Caucasus. In particular, the course focuses on inter-state economic, trade and energy relations in the region, on regional security issues including frozen conflicts and on current forms of regional cooperation. It also discusses the Black Sea and Eastern Neighbourhood policy of the European Union as well as that of Russia and other regional powers, such as Turkey and Greece.

Elective Courses – Winter Semester

English for Academic Purposes I

Through the course the students are introduced to the use of English for academic purposes. They are taught appropriate strategies for approaching and comprehending relatively extensive, medium difficulty authentic academic discourse related to their studies as well as other, non purely academic in nature material of various forms but which can be used as resource. In addition, they are taught the structure and conventions of academic discourse and learn related vocabulary and advanced grammatical and syntactic structures. At the same time, students develop their content knowledge and study skills. Throughout the module, extensive use is made of e-class and the Internet. In addition, students are requested to read one book for which supportive material is provided by the instructor.

Asymmetric Threats and Conflicts

The course focuses on non-conventional challenges to contemporary international security. The aim of the module is to study existing and potential threats that are formed in the context of a globalized international system. The module will focus both on the dynamics that develop within states and those that develop on a transnational and extranational level. Specifically, theoretical and practical aspects of phenomena such as “failed” states, internationalized civil conflicts, and international terrorism will be explored. At the same time, drawing examples from the modern era, the broadening of the concept of security to issues such as migration and pandemics will be examined.

French for Political Scientists

The course is addressed to students of the Department of Political Science and International Relations. Through the course the students are taught the basic structure of the French language and learn academic vocabulary related to their studies such as Political Science, International Relations and Diplomacy.

Internet and International Security

The course aims to study the role of the internet in international security, during the transition from the third to the fourth industrial revolution. As a key channel of communication and connectivity, the internet is a favourite field of action for states, violent political groups, and common criminals. Focusing on phenomena such as fake news, hacktivism, cyber-terrorism, and cyber-crime, the module aims to acquaint students with—often unseen—aspects of the internet and their implications for international security.

Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Development

The course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field linking entrepreneurship and innovation with development. The course focuses on theoretical approaches to entrepreneurship and on the relationship between entrepreneurship and development. It brings students in touch with relevant literature, focusing on the development of theoretical and analytical competences on issues of business activity. The topics examined at the course include the concept and forms of entrepreneurship, the concept and types of innovation, the importance of small and medium-sized enterprises, international entrepreneurship, technological change and innovation, the business environment, the impact of entrepreneurship on society, entrepreneurship, productivity and development, business activity and theories of development.

Global Governance and Civil Society

The concept of civil society appeared emphatically with the end of the cold war, with the wider prevalence of democratic institutions that essentially led to the creation of new forms of representation and citizenship. At the same time, globalization and the transformation of the welfare State have strengthened the role of new forms of policy-making. These new forms, such as social movements and non-governmental organizations (NGOS) began to acquire more and more attention. This course aims to analyze the political influence of civil society actors in the decision-making process. It begins with an attempt to familiarize students with concepts like civil society, social movements and NGOs, within a broader context of historical development and under the broader conceptual framework of global governance. Focusing on the most important representatives of modern civil society, the NGOs, the course will attempt to define them, and explain their role in the context of global governance. The lectures will focus on Greece considering initially the broader evolution of Civil Society and subsequently the position and the role of NGOS.

EU Policies on Sustainability and the Environment

The course focuses on European Union (EU) policies considering the environment and the concept of sustainability. It examines the objectives of “Europe 2020” strategy and its outcome on EU member states. In addition, it is investigated the deepening of member states’ cooperation in the environmental policy field and the diffusion of environmental norms and rules in other prominent EU policy areas such as, for instance, the energy sector. The course offers also an in-depth analysis of the proclamations made and tools used for the gradual decrease of the use of coal as the main source of energy fuel and the focus on renewable energy sources instead. Finally, the “European Green Deal” emblematic policy of the European Commission is thoroughly examined, as well as other topics regarding security energy issues.

Internship

The Internship Program gives the opportunity to students to work for a short period of time in public or private agencies (in Greece or abroad) whose activities are relevant to the Department’s study fields. The program aims at assisting the students to experience how theory translates into practice, that is to say, how their academic capacities and qualifications might be exploited professionally. Overall, the internship program intends to facilitate the students’ accession into the labor market.

Social Policy (in English)

This course introduces students to the theory and practice of social policy in western advanced welfare states. Because it is not possible to cover all aspects of this complex social science discipline in one programme of study, this course focuses on selected key areas in the study of social policy.

In particular, the course aims to:

  • Introduce students to key concepts and principles in social policy, such as ‘welfare’, “equality”, ‘social needs’, ‘social justice’,‘solidarity’ and ‘new social risks’.
  • Introduce students to the main research methods in social policy
  • Introduce students to the historical perspective of social policy
  • Examine competing ideological approaches to ‘welfare’ (eg. liberal, Marxist, social-democratic,  ‘third-way’ etc.)
  • Provide an overview of some of the core social policy areas (eg. health policy, labor market policy, poverty and social exclusion, social economy)
  • Introduce the concept of ‘welfare regime’ and provide an overview of the different welfare systems operating in Europe
  • Examine the development of social policy at the European level (EU)

Topics on Political Studies (in English)

The aim of this course is to acquaint students with a series of topics on the field of Political Studies. By the end of the semester, students are expected to have generated a more in-depth knowledge of Political Studies and a familiarity with the major theories and the analytical frameworks. In addition, they will have surveyed a number of important political issues in European Union and in Greece.

“Social Policy” and “Topics on Political Studies” courses are jointly offered by both Departments of the School of Social and Political Sciences (PSIR and SEP) only if there are Erasmus students during the current semester.

Elective Courses – Spring Semester

English for Academic Purposes ΙΙ

Through the course the students progress in their use of English for academic purposes. They are taught appropriate strategies for approaching and comprehending relatively extensive authentic academic discourse in written or spoken form related to their studies as well as other, non purely academic in nature material of various forms but which can be used as resource. In addition, they are further taught the structure and conventions of academic writing and speaking, including debating and presenting academic work, and learn related vocabulary and structures, as well as academic vocabulary related to their studies. At the same time, students develop their content knowledge and study skills (note-taking, etc). Throughout the module, extensive use is made of e-class and the Internet. In addition, students are requested to read one book of their choice.

Analysis of European policies using Eurostat data (Jean Monnet Centre of Excellence VisuALEU)

The semester course “Analysis of European policies using Eurostat data” is one of two components of the JMCoE’s “VisuALEU Academy” specific activity.

The course is an EU-focused, ICT based course on contextual and decisional policy analysis. The emphasis is on developing competence in finding and retrieving EU policy information from EU and EU affiliated websites, data from Eurostat and other providers and to apply bivariate and multivariate techniques to query policy effectiveness.

French for Political and Social Scientists

The course is addressed to both students of the Department of Political Science and International Relations and students of Social and Educational Policy. Through the course the students progress in their use of French for academic purposes. They are taught appropriate strategies for approaching and comprehending authentic academic discourse (level B1+) in written or spoken form related to their studies such as Political Science and International Relations as well as Education and Migration Policy, Human Rights, European Social Policy.

French Language and Interculturalism

The course is addressed to students of the Department of Political Science and International Relations. Through the course the students become familiar with the intercultural relations and metaphors between Greece and France. By means of appropriately selected texts and media resources, the students will study notions such as Greekness and Otherness, Me and the Other, multidimensional and multiform identity (national, European, Balkan). In this way, the cultural inheritance is approached not as a closed system but as a continuous confrontation between the familiar and the foreign.

Topics on Greek Foreign Policy

The course studies Greece’s position in the international system and discusses the main parameters that determine the country’s foreign policy. It acquaints students with the chronic problems of Greek external relations, namely, the Greek-Turkish dispute, the Cyprus question, and the controversy over the name of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. The course also presents Greece’s policies for the management of proximate crises (e.g. the Balkan wars) and assesses the country’s contribution to regional stability. Moreover, it analyses Greece’s relations with all major powers and highlights the country’s participation in multilateral efforts and international institutions (mainly, in the EU, NATO and the United Nations).

Greece in the European Union

The course examines the multifaceted relationship between Greece and the European Union (EU) as it has been evolved and transformed, in particular since Greece joined the EU as the 10th official member. Building on the literature of Europeanization, the course presents institutional and functional aspects directly associated with the Greek ‘degree of fitness’, regarding norms, rules and institutional and functional prerequisites put forward by the EU. In addition, the course analyses the mechanisms allowing for policy diffusion/transfer, as well as the intervening variables which have been suggested to either facilitate or hinder the process of domestic adaptation. The overall outcome of the Europeanization of Greece is discussed in terms of retrenchment, minimum adaptation, partly change or full-scale transformation. The course also examines the capacity of the Greek state to successfully project its preferences in the EU political arena. The analysis draws on selected (domestic) policy areas, such as fiscal policy, competition (state aid), structural policy, public administration, environment etc.

Fundamental Rights

This course concerns the protection of the fundamental rights on a national and international level. As a national level is meant the protection according to Greek Constitution and it concerns the general theory of protection of fundamental rights and the protection of particular rights protected by the Greek Constitution. As an international level is meant the protection on a universal level (United Nations) and also regional, where special emphasis will be given on the European Convention for the Human Rights and the Additional Protocols, which constitute in any case internal Law, since they have been signed and ratified by the Greek State.

Literature, Arts and Politics (Greece and Europe)

Literature and contemporary culture are not merely sources of entertainment and decoration. From Shakespeare to Salman Rushdie and Orhan Pamuk, literature has played a powerful part within society. It has been censored and sponsored, used as propaganda and for protest. This course gives students the opportunity to study in detail and in depth the ways in which society and its forms of expression are linked. The inscription of historical memory and the traumatic experience in literary texts, films or paintings is another theme discussed extensively in this course. It also examines some forms of literary ‘resistance’ in authoritarian and fascist regimes. The course aims at familiarizing students with current academic debates on the inscription of Ideology in the text and the Arts.

Political Parties and Polls

The aim of the course is to present and highlight the relationship between political parties and political polls, as well as the basic characteristics and stages of the modern research process. Students learn about the history of political parties with a focus on Greece. They also learn the history of political polls in Greece, the relevant legislative framework and understand the characteristics of the methodological tools of political polls, the techniques and stages of conducting research. They reflect on the role of opinion polls in the understanding and analysis of political and social reality. Students will understand the relationship between political opinion polls and the media and how parties and governments use opinion polls for the development of communication, political and electoral strategies. They are also concerned with the particularities and problems of opinion polls related to the rules of conducting and publishing them. Students participate in learning activities (exercises) developing skills and abilities in the use of writing, gathering and prioritising data from various sources (internet).

Internship

The Internship Program gives the opportunity to students to work for a short period of time in public or private agencies (in Greece or abroad) whose activities are relevant to the Department’s study fields. The program aims at assisting the students to experience how theory translates into practice, that is to say, how their academic capacities and qualifications might be exploited professionally. Overall, the internship program intends to facilitate the students’ accession into the labor market.

The Palestinian Issue: A Comparative Approach

The course follows the Palestinian Issue from the British Mandate to the fragmentation of the Palestinian Territories in the the West Bank and the the Gaza Strip in the 2000s. It comprises a comparative analysis of the Palestinian Issue with the Irish Issue and the Algerian national liberation movement.

Topics on International Studies (in English)

The aim of this course is to acquaint students with a series of topics on the field of International Relations. Students will be presented with a series of case studies within the field of International Studies exploring the various ways in which relevant actors are affecting significant developments. By the end of the semester, students are expected to have generated a more in-depth knowledge of International Studies, main theories and analytical frameworks. In addition, they will have acquired a broad perspective on current issues in contemporary global politics.

“Topics on International Studies” course is jointly offered by both Departments of the School of Social and Political Sciences (PSIR and SEP) only if there are Erasmus students during the current semester.

Education Policy (in English)

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the theory and practice of modern educational policy. The course starts out with an overview of the most important theoretical approaches shaping modern education policy. The course places a special interest in addressing issues such as education leadership, the interplay between institutions and education, the role of education in economic development, understanding the growing importance of technology in shaping educational services, while issues relating to socioeconomic inequality are also central to the course. Both formal and informal institutions of education are discussed, including the political, organizational, economic, and social factors affecting schools and higher education institutes. The course is grounded in a wide and updated interdisciplinary literature stemming from sociology, political science, and economics reflecting the diverse research and teaching interests of the faculty members.

EURopen. For an Open Europe. Civilization, Philosophy and History (Jean Monnet Module)

 

 

The aim of the course is the familiarization of students with the genesis of a common european spiritual identity as the product of the intemingling of different cultural and political traditions. Within the frame of the course crucial milestones which have forged the unitiy of the european spirit will be studied: scholastic philosophy as the synthesis of Reason and Faith, the poetry of the troubadours as a “discovery” of the invidual, the “right of the nations” as the moderation of war violence, the common european culture of the Enlightenment, the romantic rebellion of “individuality”. The “Age of Revolution”, the age of the Concert of Powers, the First World War and the Interwar period will be studied in the perspective of the idea of “European Unity” as a response to the violent conflicts, inimities, exclusions, national purifications and violent migratory flows. The idea of “European Unity” will be also seen in the light of collective traumas which are registered in the common european consciousness through the literature of memory, in the european cinema and theater.