Courses Description

Compulsory Courses

Contents

 

Term 1

English Ι

The course introduces students to the specialized terminology and the main concepts of Political Science and International Relations.

 

Introduction to International Politics

The course studies the interaction among state and non-state actors in the international environment. Its objective is to introduce the students to the main features of the international system as well as familiarize them with the core concepts and research tools of the discipline of international relations. Moreover, the course acquaints the students with the most important issues featuring in the world agenda, namely, the struggle against poverty and underdevelopment, the protection of human rights, the spread of democracy, and the fight against terrorism. Altogether, the course prepares the students for the needs of the Spring term course on International Relations.

 

Introduction to Political Science

For the purposes of this course, Political Science is defined in a broad sense, including the study of power and the state, as well as the study of phenomena that have political dimensions and perform a political function. The aim of the course is the acquaintance with the sources, the basic concepts, theories and methodological tools by which Political Science tries to conceive and interpret the different forms of the political phenomenon and the demonstration of its pluralistic character. Thus, it will serve as a basis for more advanced courses.

 

Research and Methods in Social Sciences

The course serves as an introduction to first-year students to methods in social sciences. Research and Methods in Social Sciences seeks to introduce new-comer, first-year students to the ways research is conducted and knowledge is produced in social sciences. In addition to outlining the fundamentals of qualitative methods, it discusses several aspects of the philosophy of social sciences. Also, it tries to act as a practical, instruction guide to social science research and writing: study of literature, constructing the framework for analysis, data compilation, testing of hypotheses or arguments, scrutiny of findings, and proposals for further research.

 

Modern Greek History

The objective of this course is to introduce students to Greek history of the 20th century. The historical facts are presented in the context of deeper systemic, political, economic, social and ideological realities in order to promote a genuine understanding of contemporary Greece up to the present. Domestic issues are studied in parallel with foreign policy and security strategies through the intensive analysis of social cleavages, institutional structures, the political party system and the decision-making processes. The students obtain knowledge that allows them to study Greece as part of the broader European and international history and, at the same time, to be able to assess its special features through time. The course requires that students learn to inject into the study of history basic lessons of political, economic and IR theory.

 

Modern European and World History

This course aims to affiliate students with the dynamics and interaction of modern European and World history. The contents are structured chronologically and thematically for offering a comprehensive study of major historical events and their wider global impact. Through this course the students will acquire an understanding of the various ways in which the legacy of recent history shapes current European and international issues. They will integrate their European perspective into a wider global view of historical developments. The course also requires that students learn to inject into the study of history basic lessons of political, economic and IR theory.

 

Term 2

English ΙΙ

The course aims at improving the oral and written capacity of students to express arguments in english with respect to topics related to the disciplines of Political Science and International Relations.

 

Principles of Law-Constitutional Law

The course includes basic concepts of a general theory of Constitutional Law, polity issues, as well as the sources of Greek Constitutional Law. The choice of issues analyzed enhances the Politics student’s understanding of law rules affecting Greek politics. Teaching rests on a combination of theoretical analysis and their application. The course includes the basic concepts and the elements of general theory of Constitutional Law, elements of politology, as well as the sources of the Greek Constitutional Law. The choice of the particular subjects to be analyzed seeks to meet the need of a political scientist to approach the meaning of the rules of the law which regulate Greek political life. The teaching of the course provides a combination of theoretical analysis and application of these rules. The aim of the course is the familiarization with the fundamental concepts, the main methodological conclusions of Constitutional Law.

 

International Relations

International Relations is the field of social sciences that examines the dynamics and practice of world politics in the past and present in a theoretically informed way. In essence, it is a discipline that studies thoroughly the phenomenon of war and peace in space and time focusing on the relations developed between state and non-state actors in areas of human activity that go through and across borders, territories and regions. From this angle, the course provides an overview of the history and development of the discipline of international relations great debates and major schools of thought while discussing relevant methodological issues, along with aspects of the philosophy of social sciences.

 

Introduction to Economics

This course familiarizes students with basic notions and terminology of economic theory. In particular, in the context of microeconomics, it examines the concept of the market and supply/demand, of competition, oligopoly and monopoly, as well as some aspects of cost-benefit analysis and game theory. It also introduces some major concepts and terminology of macroeconomics such as GDP, inflation, unemployment, growth, fiscal vs. monetary policy, and exports-imports-balance of trade.

 

Political Theory

The course investigates aspects of modern political theory from the 16th to the 19th centuries. Its aim is twofold: (a) the acquaintance with some of the most influential political ideas and arguments of the modern era in connection with the intellectual context in which they took place and (b) the study of primary texts as an indispensable source of knowledge and as a means to cultivate critical thinking.

 

Political Sociology I

In this course we attempt a first acquaintance with the science of sociology in general, and in particular with the branch of political sociology. Sociology is the scientific study of human groups, big or small, and of societies, in of particular contemporary industrial societies. The course focuses on social life in contemporary world and is interested in the social relations of human beings, which organize and give meaning to their lives. We attempt a first contact and introduction to basic concepts and approaches of sociology in a systematic way. This attempt aims at enlarging the horizons of students and provide them with a global conception of social facts and the world in which they live. The understanding of particular social situations as much as of society in general and of contemporary societies and their context, the enforcement of capacity of appreciating the effects of policies, the understanding of basic social distinctions and cultural differences, the significance of sociological theory and of research in sociology, constitute the aims of the course with practical significance and decisive influence and impact on the unfolding of political phenomena. The aim of the course is to contribute to the sensibilisation of students on these issues.

 

Term 3

Basic Principles of Macroeconomic Policy

The course “Basic Principles of Macroeconomic Policy” is designed to help the students understand thoroughly the behavior of the economy as a whole. To study the overall performance of the economy, the course gives particular emphasis on economic policies and policy variables that affect that performance – on monetary and fiscal policies, the money stock and interest rates, the public debt, the budget and the public deficits, the balance of payments and the determination of income in an open economy.

 

International Law

The International Law regulates several aspects of social behavior. It is not limited, as in the past, in the inter-state relations and pervades major segments of internal law. The major objects of regulations concern the pacific solution of international conflicts and the avoidance of violence, the protection of human dignity and the international cooperation in every field. The  rules of International Law refer to the internal as well as to the international protection of human rights and to the international economic relations. Dealing with international law involves not only governments, international organizations, international institutions and international institutions of the state as well as simple citizens, as well as those whose intention is the creation of an international civil society. The aim of the course is the familiarization with the fundamental concepts, the main methodological proceedings and the basic conclusions of Public International Law.

 

Economic Theory and Development

The course is intended to introduce students to the concepts of economic development and growth, studying the evolution of various theoretical approaches. It familiarizes students with a broad range of related issues, such as GDP and alternative development indices, balanced vs. non-balanced growth models, poverty, demography and migration, inequality, technology and development, import substitution vs. trade liberalism, environmental aspects, and globalization.

 

Political Sociology II

The course focuses on the study of politics and of the political sub-systems of society. Emphasis  is put on the idea that the examination of political institutions must take in account their organic ties with the society in which they subsist and function and they should be viewed as separate and independent systems. Also, basic aim of the course is the familiarization with the basic terminology of Political Sociology. Beginning with the major precursors of Political Sociology, Aristotle, Machiaveli, Montesquieu and under the guidance of classic sociologists such as Marx and Weber, as well as contemporaries from Parsons to Foucault and Bourdieu, we approach in a critical way the central concepts-phenomena of force, power, politics, obligation, legitimization and instability of political regimes, as they are shaped in every society and in particular in the later contemporary modern society. Further aim of the course is the awareness of the process of “construction” and shaping of our political-social self, in relation with basic political structures, institutions, systems, functions and ideologies, within the frame of contemporary, modern or post-industrial, globalized society.

 

Political Philosophy

The course investigates the principles of justice involved in the legitimization of the various political regimes. It studies the major theories of social justice, focusing on the principles of contractual justice and of utility, with emphasis given to their critique by the liberal theories of justice and by marxist, feminist and communitarian lines of thought. The course also attempts to highlight the break between the modern and pre-modern conceptions, among which the platonic principle of functional reciprocity,  andthearistotelian principle of geometrical equality,

 

Comparative Politics

Comparative politics is the study of the most important political similarities and differences between/among political entities (countries, institutions, etc). Comparative politics is first and foremost a method to study a variety of political phenomena, becoming comparative government (if it studies government), comparative electoral studies (if it studies electoral systems), comparative foreign policy (if it studies foreign policy) etc. The course aims to familiarize students with the fundamental concepts, analytical methods and basic conclusions of comparative politics. It also aims to prepare students for courses of the two final years of study in both Political Science and International Relations (particularly Area Studies).

 

Term 4

Emerging Powers and Global Governance

The course examines recent developments in the international political and economic scene in the context of the emergence of new powers such as Brazil, India and China. It focuses on the ways in which a number of developing nations have managed to significantly strengthen their positions on the global stage leading to a de facto reorganization of global governance. It focuses on the economic and political choices of these states over the last decades as well as on how the global environment favored their growth. The purpose of the course is to familiarize students with the reasons why emerging powers have emerged as important players in the global system, the role of economic crises on the international scene, the regional choices of these states and their results as well as the ways in which international organizations and institutions are transformed by the new phenomenon.

 

International Political Economy

The aim of the course is to familiarize students with a new field in international (economic) relations, the International Political Economy (IPE). It has now become commonly understood that the study of comprehensive issues such as the international economic and political relations, the international financial system, development and underdevelopment, and North-South interdependence, requires a holistic, multidisciplinary approach. Politics and economics, internal and external affairs, are part of the same whole through which we assess and understand the complex reality. At first, we analyze the basic theoretical approaches in International Political Economy. Secondly, we assess special issues of IPE with emphasis on the formulation and the outcomes of the international financial, economic and political system and structures from the Second World War onwards.

 

European Integration

The course focuses on the institutional and political organization of the EU, with reference to the Treaties of Maastricht, Amsterdam, Nice and Lisbon. It analyzes the main theoretical approaches to European integration: functionalism and neo-functionalism, intergovernmentalism and the supra-national model, the goals and weaknesses of those models in determining teleologically the future of a united Europe. Furthermore, it examines the role of the European institutions such as the Commission, the Council of Ministers, the European Parliament, the Court of Justice and the main processes and policies, with particular emphasis on the Common Foreign and Security Policy.

 

Theories of Culture

The course examines modern cultural theories with reference to the most important periods of cultural thought in the 20th century. The course underlines, through the study of texts and other cultural products, the interdisciplinary character of cultural thought – the interaction of cultural studies with political science, social anthropology, comparative literature, sociology and feminist studies. The aim of this course is to familiarize students with the basic cultural concepts and with the works of the most widely recognized western thinkers at the fields of cultural studies, feminist thought and comparative imagology.

 

Political Leadership

The course aims at approaching the phenomenon of leadership especially within the framework of a democratic political system. It assesses principal theories, values and features of leadership, models of leadership in the fields of society and the economy, the significance of leadership to the functioning of political and social institutions and the importance of gender. Moreover, leadership is seen with regard to decision-making with emphasis on the values and principles of public interest, as well as on the structures, functions and the overall regulatory framework of modern governance that influence the quality of decision-making.

 

Conflict and Security in World Politics

Drawing on theoretical debates and discussion developed in the first-year course on International Relations, this course focuses on two analytical categories, that is, conflict and security, which matter a great deal to making sense of world politics.  Conflict and security are taken to result from the driving forces of competition and cooperation in the anarchical international society, which in turn determine the evolution of peace and war. Within this theoretical framework, the course seeks to discuss conflict and security in the view of: a) the traditional and contemporary IR theories, b) the part that state and non-state agents play in determining their evolution, and c) the experience of practice, and of the challenges of the future.

 

History of European Integration

The course analyzes the progress towards European integration during the 20th century. The evolution of the European idea is put in historical perspective, such as the concern for the continent’s future in the pre- and post-WWII period and during the Cold War. Focusing on economic issues, it examines the formation of the European Communities, the customs union and common trade policy, the single market, the EC/EU budget, the cohesion issue, and the EMU.

 

Term 5 – Specialization: Political Science

European Union Law

The course provides a thorough examination of EC/EU institutions and their significance for European citizens. Following a historical overview of European integration up to the present, the course goes on to examine: a) the EU/EC legal nature and mission, b) EU/EC Institutions (Council, Commission, European Parliament, European Court of Justice), c) Acts adopted by European institutions, d) the judicial protection system, and e) citizen rights according to the European Court of Justice in case of a member state’s violation of community law (direct effect, the supremacy of EU over national law, indirect effect, right of compensation.

 

Democracy: History, Theory, Contemporary Challenges

The course comprises three interrelated units: in the first it examines a selection of important «moments» of Democracy qua ideal or/and regime, such as the moment of classical Athens and its «re-invention» in the XVIIIth century. In the second unit it examines some models of democracy, mainly from a theoretical point of view, such as the model of participative Democracy, of deliberative Democracy, agonistic Democracy, as well as the model of the economic theory of Democracy. In the third unit, it examines the state of « malaise » or crisis observed in contemporary democracies and the challenges they have to meet, such as the problems of democratic control, legitimization and account ability which issue from the reduction of the power of national representative institutions and the fragmented character of world governance, the tendancies of the rise of populism and extremism, the relation of the tension between technocracy and popular sovereignty etc. Students are expected, through the combination of knowledge acquired in other courses, to penetrate the phenomenon of democracy, to grasp significant dimensions of its variety and historicity, as well as to engage in a questioning concerning contemporary related issues.

 

Greek Political System

The course deals with the construction and development of the Greek political system from the perspective of political science. Some of its major themes include the functioning of fundamental political institutions, democratization, state-society relations, the party system, political ideologies, the impact of socio-economic factors, modernization and Europeanization. Major historical events for the political system are investigated, such as the beginnings of state formation, the civil war, democratic consolidation and adherence to the EC. Moreover, important aspects of the quality of the democratic process are critically approached.

 

Term 6 – Specialization: Political Science

 Political Systems and Parties in Contemporary Europe

The course assesses the role and features of political parties and party systems as regards the functions of democratic representation, the exercise of political power and its democratic control. Its major themes concern democratic consolidation, political culture, typologies of party systems, political ideologies, the role of parties in the functioning of parliamentary institutions and executive bodies. Moreover, emphasis is given to the influence of social factors and historical events on the formation of particular cleavages – and correspondingly, to the rise or fall of particular parties – and on the ‘crisis of representation’ that some developed democracies are faced with.

 

State and Civil Society

The course approaches the relations of State and Society through MichaelWalzer’s concept of « spheres of justice » and the distinct principles of distribution of social goods that regulate the spheres of membership, office, welfare, market, religion, education, family, political power. Within this conceptual framework the course strives to elucidate the historical phenomenon of the modern State and the concomitant process of the emergence of an autonomous « Civil Society ».

 

Policy Analysis and Decision Making.

The purpose of this module is introduce students to policy analysis, namely the concepts and processes that lead to the public policies. Although the emphasis of the module will be on the procedural view of policy analysis, a number of factors affecting public policies will also be discussed such as forms of governance, political approaches, decision making issues, and the setting and pursuing of specific policy objectives. In addition, topics such as labour relations, social justice, voting, public procurement, taxation systems, etc. may also be discussed during the course as public policy paradigms.

 

Term 5 – Specialization: International Relations

European Union Law

The course provides a thorough examination of EC/EU institutions and their significance for European citizens. Following a historical overview of European integration up to the present, the course goes on to examine: a) the EU/EC legal nature and mission, b) EU/EC Institutions (Council, Commission, European Parliament, European Court of Justice), c) Acts adopted by European institutions, d) the judicial protection system, and e) citizen rights according to the European Court of Justice in case of a member state’s violation of community law (direct effect, the supremacy of EU over national law, indirect effect, right of compensation).

 

Foreign Policy Analysis

The course studies decisions and actions of state and non-state actors that aim at influencing their external environment. It introduces students to the complexity of the foreign decision-making process and discusses the main domestic and international factors that affect the exercise of foreign policy. Some of the questions that are dealt with in the courses are the following: How are decisions of foreign policy taken? What is the role of individuals in the process? How do the personality and the beliefs of decision-makers affect their actions? Which factors usually lead to wrong decisions in foreign policy?

Strategic Studies

Strategic Studies is the field of the discipline of international relations that explores, focusing on human action and power, how the relation of means to the ends of policy plays its part in shaping occurrences, trends and transformations in world politics. It is substantially a subject that, cutting across such subjects of the discipline as security and defence studies, geopolitics, crisis management, conflict resolution and foreign policy analysis, is formulated through and by the interdisciplinary dialogue engagement of International Relations with History, Political Science and Sociology. It is from this perspective that drawing attention to violence and its main component, military force, sets the thread of the problematique over the phenomenon of war and peace. Equipped with this framework of analysis, the course sheds light on the history of strategic thought to make the conceptual and theoretical fundamentals of strategic studies familiar to students.

 

Term 6 – Specialization: International Relations

Political Parties and Systems in Contemporary Europe

The course assesses the role and features of political parties and party systems as regards the functions of democratic representation, the exercise of political power and its democratic control. Its major themes concern democratic consolidation, political culture, typologies of party systems, political ideologies, the role of parties in the functioning of parliamentary institutions and executive bodies. Moreover, emphasis is given to the influence of social factors and historical events on the formation of particular cleavages – and correspondingly, to the rise or fall of particular parties – and on the ‘crisis of representation’ that some developed democracies are faced with.

 

International Relations of East Asia and the EU (Jean Monnet Program)

Nowadays, a ‘power shift’ is taking place in the global political economy from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean owing to the rapid growth of China (and in the recent past of neighboring Japan). While economic interdependence and regional co-operation (see for instance the establishment of ASEAN) are intense in Eastern Asia, conflicts for natural resources (e.g. Sea of South China), and territorial disputes (e.g. between China and Japan and between China and Taiwan) are not absent from the region. Not surprisingly, the EU has been increasingly turning its attention to Eastern Asia and is currently emerging in to an important economic partner of the region’s countries. The course analyzes the political-economic and social dynamics of Eastern Asia and assesses the impact of the EU policies towards the region.

 

Political and Economic Relations in the Black Sea region

The course “Political and Economic Relations in the Black Sea region” studies the structures and processes that comprise the political economy of the Black Sea as a geopolitical entity and affect the behavior of states and other actors in this region. Specifically, the course focuses on the following thematic areas: major political and economic issues in the Black Sea region in post-Cold War period with an emphasis on “transition” to a market economy; Current schemes of regional cooperation; issues ‘soft security’; bilateral security problems and regional cooperation; outstanding conflicts; economic aspects of regional cooperation; the role and policies of the European Union to the region (enlargement, Eastern Partnership); the policies of key local states (Greece, Russia, Turkey)

 

Term 7 – Specialization: Political Science

Nations and Nationalism

In both political science and international relations, the understanding of the ideology of nationalism as well as the emergence, nature and legitimacy of contemporary nation-states is of crucial importance. Without an interpretation of the dynamics of these phenomena, political issues ranging from sovereignty to power relationships and from regional co-operation to violent conflicts (inter or intra-state) become completely incomprehensible. The course is an introduction to nationalism, focusing especially but not exclusively on the European experience. It aims to familiarize students with all theoretical paradigms of nationalism and also to evaluate their explanatory power with references to a number of case–studies. Particular emphasis is also given to the consequences of nationalism, both positive (democracy and capitalism) and negative (stereotypes, feelings of superiority etc.).

 

Elections, Electoral Systems and Electoral Behavior 

The course describes how electoral laws and electoral systems affect the interests of the parties, the intra party life, the structure, the competition among political parties and the formation of the political party systems. Moreover, the relations between voters and the party identification, the phenomenon of the volatile electoral behavior and the current tendency of individualization will be examined.  Finally, emphasis will be given on the methods of surveying public opinion (polls) and the influence they exercise over the current political parties and party systems. The objective of this course is to analyze the role of the elections and the electoral systems in party politics and party systems. The course describes how electoral laws and electoral systems affect the interests of the parties, the intra party life, the structure, the competition among political parties and the formation of the political party systems.

 

Political Communication and Mass Media

The course studies the ideological and practical influence of various mass media (the press, cinema, television, internet etc) on the formation of public opinion. Particular emphasis is given to their influence on contemporary political behavior, the management of political power, communication strategies of parties, governments, organizations, economic and social institutions. Attention is also paid to the influence of public opinion on the agenda and ideological preferences of mass media. Empirical cases are combined with relevant theoretical analysis of fundamental notions in philosophy and communication.  The course offers an introduction to the mechanisms of communication activities in the field of politics through practices, such as planning and management of electoral campaign, the use of political resources and mass media and the analysis of public opinion polls.

 

Term 8 – Specialization: Political Science

 National and International Protection of Fundamental Rights

This course concerns the protection of the fundamental rights on a national and international level. As a national level is meant the protection according to Greek Constitution and it concerns the general theory of protection of fundamental rights and the protection of particular rights protected by the Greek Constitution. As an international level is meant the protection on a universal level (United Nations) and also regional, where special emphasis will be given on the European Convention for the Human Rights and the Additional Protocols, which constitute in any case internal Law, since they have been signed by the Greek State.

 

Politics and Violence

The course examines various theories explaining political violence. It focuses on modern phenomena of social and political uprisings, insurgencies and terrorism, both domestic and international.  Moreover, the course is dealing with terrorism activity after 1960s and the transformation of political violence in the 21st century.

 

Political Ideologies

This course strives to offer a map with the major ideologies – Liberalism, Conservatism, Nationalism, Anarchism, Fascism- National Socialism -, and also more contemporary movements like Feminism and versions of religious fundamentalism as well as populism seen as “a thin-centred” ideologies . In the last lectures the course attempts to familiarize the ideological analysis with a selective reference to conceptual approaches, and also through discourse analysis. Students are expected on the one hand to construct a fundamental body of knowledge relative to the more important ideological currents, and on the other hand to form a critical ability of recognizing and appreciating ideological patterns as they unfold in contemporary political discourse.

 

Term 7 – Specialization: International Relations

National and International Protection of Fundamental Rights

This course concerns the protection of the fundamental rights on a national and international level. As a national level is meant the protection according to Greek Constitution and it concerns the general theory of protection of fundamental rights and the protection of particular rights protected by the Greek Constitution. As an international level is meant the protection on a universal level (United Nations) and also regional, where special emphasis will be given on the European Convention for the Human Rights and the Additional Protocols, which constitute in any case internal Law, since they have been signed by the Greek State.

 

Nations and Nationalism

In both political science and international relations, the understanding of the ideology of nationalism as well as the emergence, nature and legitimacy of contemporary nation-states is of crucial importance. Without an interpretation of the dynamics of these phenomena, political issues ranging from sovereignty to power relationships and from regional co-operation to violent conflicts (inter or intra-state) become completely incomprehensible. The course is an introduction to nationalism, focusing especially but not exclusively on the European experience. It aims to familiarize students with all theoretical paradigms of nationalism and also to evaluate their explanatory power with references to a number of case–studies. Particular emphasis is also given to the consequences of nationalism, both positive (democracy and capitalism) and negative (stereotypes, feelings of superiority etc.).

 

International Economic Relations

This course introduces students to basic theories that explain international trade relations, the international monetary system and financial market operations. The section of international trade will cover the basic theories of trade, the export-oriented growth strategy as well as the political economy of trade policy. Moreover, the role of foreign direct investment and of the multinational companies will be discussed. Monetary aspects of the international economy are the subject of the second section.  After a short presentation of the history of the international monetary system, the workings of the foreign exchange market will be analyzed. Moreover, issues like the rationale behind and effects of different exchange-rate policy regimes, the underlying reasons for international financial crises, the interplay between international and domestic macroeconomic forces in the adjustment of the Balance of Payments, will be discussed in this section.

 

Regional Security in the Middle East

The course explores international relations and security in the region of the Middle East. In particular, it presents the history of intractable conflicts (e.g., the Arab-Israeli conflict), their causes and prospects for peaceful resolution. It also examines the rise of radical Islam, the issue of terrorism, the role of minorities in the region, the clash between Shia and Sunni Muslims, Iran’s regional role, nuclear proliferation, and US, EU and Russian policies in the Middle East.

 

Term 8 – Specialization: International Relations

The International Relations of Africa and the European Union

Relations between the European Union and Sub-Saharan Africa are deep and complex. The EU is by far the African continent’s main trade partner and its main source of development assistance, while several all-encompassing agreements have created a sense of a common space that some commentators have defined as ‘Eurafrica’. In recent years there has been extensive diplomatic activity. A variety of new agreements and ambitious declarations have created a growing sense of an ever closer and more balanced relationship. In particular, trade relations between Europe and Africa are in the process of being reformulated.

 

National and International Protection of Fundamental Rights

This course concerns the protection of the fundamental rights on a national and international level. As a national level is meant the protection according to Greek Constitution and it concerns the general theory of protection of fundamental rights and the protection of particular rights protected by the Greek Constitution. As an international level is meant the protection on a universal level (United Nations) and also regional, where special emphasis will be given on the European Convention for the Human Rights and the Additional Protocols, which constitute in any case internal Law, since they have been signed by the Greek State.

 

Regional Security in South Eastern Europe

The course discusses the intermingled web of security issues that have tormented South Eastern Europe since the end of the Cold War. Its main objective is to analyze the ramifications of Yugoslavia’s disintegration and to acquaint students with the policies, concerns and threat perceptions of the region’s countries. The course also evaluates international efforts to manage the conflicts in South Eastern Europe and the several processes and initiatives for regional cooperation that have at times been developed (e.g. Royaumont Process, SECI, SEECP and Regional Cooperation Council). Finally, it analyses the effort of all countries from the region to become full members of the Euro-Atlantic security structures.

 

 

Elective Courses – Winter Term

(students are expected to select three elective courses in each of the winter terms)

 

Asymmetric Threats and Conflicts: Middle East and Caucasus

The course focuses on non-conventional international security challenges in a globalized international system. Drawing on case studies from the Middle East and Caucasus, the course examines the theoretical and practical aspects of phenomena, such as internationalized civil wars, international terrorism and the use of Internet by armed non-state actors. The main aim of the course is to study non-state actors and comprehend the challenges and the security issues that arise in the arc of instability that extends from the Caucasus to the Middle East.

 

Management of Risk and Crises

Risk management focuses on the concepts and methods used by organizations to identify, analyze and manage risks, and dealing with the unexpected in general. Crisis management deals with risks that materialize but allow for corrective actions before their outcomes have been finalized. Various frameworks are considered, and existing intenrational standards on risk management are also discussed during the course.

 

International Cooperation for Development

The aim of the course is to familiarize students with the meaning, content and practices of development cooperation policies. These are some of the issues to be discussed: Are development cooperation policies (or should they be) an integral part of foreign policy objectives rather than a mechanism whose sole objective is to provide relief and assistance to those in need? Which are the limits between development cooperation and economic diplomacy? Moreover, the students will assess, through a series of case studies, the implementation mechanisms, the objectives and when possible the efficiency of development cooperation policies, mainly those of the European Union and its member states and the U.S.

 

Topics on European Integration and International Economy

This “seminar” course invites students to specialize on various issues of european integration and/or international political economy. It involves research on a specific area of their choice and a written essay of about 5,000 words. Students should present their essays in the context of oral examination at the end of term. Topics include aspects of European economic integration (e.g. the EMU, the single market, the first steps and the evolution of the EEC) as well as of the world economy (e.g. globalization and inequality in historical perspective). Students are strongly advised to have successfully completed related courses in their previous years of study.

 

Topics on Political Philosophy

The course focuses on the concept of a « just war », as it is elaborated within the tradition of moral philosophy and in the frame of historical practice. The course comprises a theoretical part which articulates the philosophical principles that can guide the study of the concept, the emphasis given to utilitarianism, kantian deontological ethics, nitzschean genealogy and the neo-arisotelian philosophies of action. The second part of the course comprises applications of the above principles to the study of major modern conflicts, from the colonial interventions of the 19th century up to today’s « humanitarian » wars.

 

Introduction to Geopolitics

Geopolitics is the branch of International Relations which seeks to understand, explain, and predict international political behavior by using geographical variables. Typical geographical variables are the location, size, climate, demography and natural resources  The course examines the history of geopolitical thought from the German geographers of the 19th century and Halford Mackinder’s ‘heartland theory’ to French geopolitical thought that attempted to ‘de-nationalize’ geopolitics, and contemporary critical geopolitics that emphasize geographical discourses and study geographical imagination. Much attention is paid to the influence of geopolitical ideas on policy-making.

 

Methods of Analysis and Processing of data in Social Sciences

The aim of the course is to cultivate the “empirical” analytical thought. It concerns the development of knowledge and competitions  aiming the description and the understanding of complex or less complex social phenomena through information and data.

Meeting the demands of the course, students will be able to synthesize and proceed into integrated analyses on issues of social, economic or political interest. Students will learn how to:

  • trace, recuperate and process quantitative and qualitative public data on issues of social, economic or political character
  • choose from an array of analytical techniques and apply them to the exploration of issues of social, economic or political character,
  • interpret and further present in a creative way the results of their analyses through the use of advanced representations and formalized references

The course is based upon the three axes: data-information-knowledge, that is, upon the way knowledge is built: from data to information and from information to knowledge.

 

Greek Economy

The purpose of this course is to study the development of the Greek Economy during the last fifty years. At a first stage, it analyzes the models of economic development and the protectionism that have prevailed until the 1980s. At a next stage, it extensively discusses issues such as the effects of EΕC accession, the macroeconomic policy of the 1980s, the change in the monetary policy in the 1990s, the way that Greece chose to reduce inflation and fulfill the Maastricht criteria, the economic policy in the period following the introduction of the euro as well as the causes of the recent economic crisis.

 

European Civilization: The Feminist Movement

The course aims to introduce students to Gender Studies through the history  of Feminism and to familiarize them with the basic concepts of feminist theory and feminist critique. The course examines the most important developments in feminist history in the United States and Europe, presents the contribution of significant feminist thinkers (among others Olympe de Gouges, Mary Wollstonecraft, Simon de Beauvoir, etc.) and analyzes the basic theoretical approaches of the movement (liberal feminism, marxist feminism etc.).

 

Theoretical Approaches to Social and Political Institutions

The course examines the various ways of understanding how formal and informal institutions function and the ways in which they frame the action of human agents in the social and political fields. In this context, institutions constitute a distinct subject which can shed light on the interrelationship between society and politics. Special emphasis is given in examining the interplay between institutions and political agents in case studies from the European political systems.

 

Data analysis skills and methods for Social Scientists

In this module we aim to cultivate the so called ’empirical’ thinking which is based the progressive evolution of data into information into knowledge. The content of the module is focused on the acquisition and development of skills used for analyzing and synthesizing qualitative and quantitative data in order to describe or even explain simple or more complex social phenomena. From this perspective this is an introductory analytics course with the emphasis put on data manipulation, incl. data summarization and visualization and some elementary statistics concepts. The module is hands-on, intensive, and is delivered in seminar mode in the departmental computer room. Students are required to use the relevant software, almost exclusively, in order to complete the course successfully. Students are also expected to dedicate plenty of time practicing the skills showcased and acquired during the seminars. The software used includes for most part spreadsheets and plain text processors and, depending on the class performance it may include elementary usage of more sophisticated software like SPSS and the KNIME Analytics Platform. Student assessment is conducted during the seminars and has an optional, more challenging, end-of-term capstone assignment for extra credit.

                           

Organization and functioning of the Greek public administration

The course focuses on the Greek public administration from an analytical, comparative and critical perspective. In particular, is examined the historical formulation and evolution of the organization and structure of the Greek public administration, the policy framework, as well as the scope of the corresponding responsibilities, taking into account modern challenges that bring about pressures for administrative reforms. Students will have the opportunity to familiarize themselves with the basic principles of the Greek administrative system and will be able to discuss issues relevant with the effectiveness and efficiency of the Greek public administration.

 

Global Governance and Civil Society

The concept of civil society appeared emphatically with the end of the cold war, with the wider prevalence of democratic institutions that essentially led to the creation of new forms of representation and citizenship. At the same time, globalization and the transformation of the welfare State have strengthened the role of new forms of policy-making. These new forms, such as social movements and non-governmental organizations (NGOS) began to acquire more and more attention. This course aims to analyze the political influence of civil society actors in the decision-making process. It begins with an attempt to familiarize students with concepts like civil society, social movements and NGOs, within a broader context of historical development and under the broader conceptual framework of global governance. Focusing on the most important representatives of modern civil society, the NGOs, the course will attempt to define them, and explain their role in the context of global governance. The lectures will focus on Greece considering initially the broader evolution of Civil Society and subsequently the position and the role of NGOS.

 

Global Diasporas

The course examines different diasporas, i.e., the Jewish diaspora, the Armenian diaspora, the African diaspora, the Chinese diaspora, the Indian diaspora, the colonial diasporas, the Greek diaspora etc. Through a comparative approach, it analyzes in detail the transformations of national identity, the links with the mother-country and the relationship with the hosting country. Despite important differences in the ways they have been constructed (violence, forced movement, voluntary exodus etc), diasporas share a number of common characteristics. The course aims to familiarize students with issues of migration and the construction of diasporas and focuses on the cultural aspects of the phenomenon.

 

Environment and Politics

This course examines contemporary environmental issues and their interface with politics. Apart from exploring the impact of global, national and local environmental issues on sustainable development and the prosperity of the society, emphasis rests also on public policies related to environmental issues (climate change, energy and water resources management). Special attention is paid to the role of different actors (political institutions and civil society) in the decision-making process and the dispersal of jurisdictions in different levels (supranational, national and local) within the context of contemporary global governance. To this end, this course introduces students to global environmental governance and acquaints them with the environmental aspects of security.

 

Regional and Local Administration

The course offers an overview of the self-governed administration in Greece focusing on the regional and local government. In essence, it is examined the impact of subnational authorities on regional development. Discussing the decentralization policy in Greece as well as governance issues, the course addresses major local and regional disparities and divergence issues and the need for tackling them by formulating and implementing sound territorial public policies. The role of subnational authorities is further taken into consideration with regard to regional development endogenous dynamics and opportunities offered in the European level, utilizing evidence from empirical case studies.

 

Political Parties and Polls

The course aims to present and draw attention to the relationship of the parties with political polls, and the basic characteristics and stages of modern research process in the social and political sphere.

Details will be presented related to :

  • The history of political polling in Greece
  • The characteristics of the methodological tools of political polling techniques and stages of the survey
  • The legislative framework of the polls in Greece
  • The peculiarities and problems of polls related to the methodology , rules of conduct and disclosure rules
  • The role of polls in the understanding and analysis of social and political reality
  • The relationship of political polling with Media
  • The relationship of the parties with political polling and that of grasping measuring public opinion in policy strategy and decision-making.
  • The analysis of polls and their correlation with  parties especially in election campaigns of modern national elections
  • The role of opinion polls on political choices parties , in modern institutional bodies such as Local Authority.

 

Internship

The Internship Program gives the opportunity to students to work for a short period of time in public or private agencies (in Greece or abroad) whose activities are relevant to the Department’s study fields. The program aims at assisting the students to experience how theory translates into practice, that is to say, how their academic capacities and qualifications might be exploited professionally. Overall, the internship program intends to facilitate the students’ accession into the labor market.

 

Contemporary Greek Society: Aspects

The subject of the course is the presentation and analysis of basic aspects of contemporary Greek society. The approach is based on combination. The analysis of various themes as well as of larger approaches of contemporary Greek society aims at the reinforcement of the understanding of the complexity and the variety that pertain to it. In this directions students have the occasion to know and study official statistics concerning Greek society, which allow a formalistic knowledge/acquaintance. On the other hand, the course of life examines aspects of modern Greek society having to do with family, work, immigration, economic activity, institutions, practices and mentalities, way of life and civil society and focuses in particular on cultural and political aspects of post-war Greece. It also presents general considerations that have been proposed in order to interpret the approaches of N.Mouzelis (development-underdevelopment), K.Tsoukalas (function of the state), K.Vergopoulos (the agrarian question), G.Voulgaris (fall of the dictatorship and after), V.Agtzidis (division of refugees and stalk-citizens), approaches of fragmented regionalism (E.Gellner, N.Mouzelis, Th.Veremis) and of cultural dualism (N.Diamantouros).

 

Topics on Contemporary History

The course focuses every year on a special subject of greek, european or world history of the 20th century, while not excluding a retrospective view on previous periods (Great Idea, Word War II, decolonization etc.). Its aim is to allow students to deepen their knowledge of major issues that marked contemporary history and familiarize them with the historical methodology and research and with greek and international historiography. The bibliography of the course changes in function of its thematic, which is announces on the start of every academic year. The course has a seminar organization. The evaluation of the students takes in account their active participation and the writing and presenting of a research paper, as well as on a written examination.

 

Topics on History and Politics (available for Erasmus students)

The course will be given in the english language and it will introduce students in aspects of the current debate in the domains of Political Science and Contemporary History. It discusses the new orientations in theoretical investigations, in combination with actual empirical issues risen contemporary politics. The course examines, among others, issues like : immigration and multiculturalism, the role of the state in economy, the significance of welfare state, internet and digital democracy, gender equality, environment and the relation of the public with the private spheres.

 

 

Elective Courses – Spring Term

(students are expected to select three elective courses in each of the spring terms)

 

European-focused Policy Analytics (EuroPolA)

EuroPoIA is an introductory data analysis course based on a multidisciplinary approach and focusing exclusively on EU policies. The aim is to develop a policy-specific data analysis paradigm that combines knowledge and skills in (a) policy discourse analysis, (b) quantitative data analysis methods, (c) data retrieval and processing skills, and (d) skills in the use of integrated analysis software to performing [a-c].

For proof-of-concept, EuroPolA focuses on the following policy pillars:

  1. EU external affairs and foreign relations
  2. Regions and local development

 

French for Politics and International Relations Ι

The course introduces students to the specialized terminology and the main concepts of Politics and International Relations in French language.

 

Topics on Greek Foreign Policy

The course studies Greece’s position in the international system and discusses the main parameters that determine the country’s foreign policy. It acquaints students with the chronic problems of Greek external relations, namely, the Greek-Turkish dispute, the Cyprus question, and the controversy over the name of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. The course also presents Greece’s policies for the management of proximate crises (e.g. the Balkan wars) and assesses the country’s contribution to regional stability. Moreover, it analyses Greece’s relations with all major powers and highlights the country’s participation in multilateral efforts and international institutions (mainly, in the EU, NATO and the United Nations).

 

The Structural Policy of the European Union in Greece

The course focuses on the structural policy of the European Union and its implementation in Greece. Taking into account the legal framework posed by the Treaty of Lisbon, critical policy issues are explored including the concept of “cohesion” (from an economic, social, and territorial dimension) the basic policy principles, the financial mechanisms (European Structural and Investment Funds – EFSI) as well as the policy process. In addition, it is examined the historical dimension of the implementation of the European structural policy in Greece from 1985 onwards on the basis of distinct programming periods (Integrated Mediterranean Programmes; Common Support Frameworks; National Strategic Reference Frameworks), the organization and the structure of the European structural programmes during the period 2014-2020 along with the implementation results both in sectoral and territorial level, and finally, the perspectives of the new programming period 2021-2027.

 

Topics in Economic Sociology

Economic sociology, sociological specialization, has been undergoing significant expansion over the past thirty years. This sociological sub-discipline is circumscribed by two main dimensions. The one concerns the sociological understanding of economic processes and structures, more broadly of economic phenomena, on the one hand. Undertaking a critique of established economic analysis of economic phenomena, and of some of their prerequisites, is the other.

The course will focus on a number of issues or specific topics, which are approached in terms of economic sociology. These are of interest, have some usability and are relevant to topics involving, among others, political scientists. They include: modern capitalism, the dimension of modernity, the social embededness of economic phenomena, the social construction of economic institutions and practices and of social reality, the market and money as a social relation, trust, social capital, social networks, migration, crisis, welfare and prosperity.

 

Religion and Politics

This course aims to examine the role of religion in contemporary international politics, emphasizing the phenomenon of religious fundamentalism. The world’s major religions (Christianity, Islam, Judaism, and Buddhism) are analyzed through this prism, in terms of their influence on political perceptions, attitudes and ideologies. It also studies particular issues, such as the clash of civilizations, respect for human rights, and new religious movements. Finally, it explores contemporary state-church relations and the contradictory role of religion in international relations and policy formulation in the US and Europe.

 

Literature, Arts and Politics (Greece and Europe)

Literature and contemporary culture are not merely sources of entertainment   and decoration. From Shakespeare to Salman Rushdie and Orhan Pamuk, literature has played a powerful part within society. It has been censored and sponsored, used as propaganda and for protest. This course gives students the opportunity to study in detail and in depth the ways in which society and its forms of expression are linked. The inscription of historical memory and the traumatic experience in literary texts, films or paintings is another theme discussed extensively in this course. It also examines some forms of literary ‘resistance’ in authoritarian and fascist regimes. The course aims at familiarizing students with current academic debates on the inscription of Ideology in the text and the Arts.

 

The new economy and the challenges in the global economic system

In the digital economy a high and increasing number of goods are produced under economies of scale conditions and equilibrium is only partially achieved through competition. An increasing number of sectors exhibit natural monopoly characteristics and the “invisible” hand of the market seems increasingly detached from the real economy. The valuation of commodities has also changed significantly. In the new economy underlying value tends to be intangible. For a growing number of goods their value is determined mainly by the ideas and knowledge that they incorporate. The ability to innovate is the key source for value and wealth creation. However, even if one succeeds to launch an innovative good, the benefits will not last for a long period of time. Sooner or later and irrespectively of the copyright laws, competitors will enter the market. The prospect of acquiring monopoly power for a limited period of time is actually what mainly motivates the business sector to undertake risks.

The intellectual constructs and economic paradigms of the present seem rather unable to reflect current realities and to provide direction for the future. Existing socio-economic theories seem unable to provide sufficient answers about the efficient management and diffusion of new technology, the way that new technology can improve the well-being of the world population as well as the way of modifying a system in motion, without losing the many gains of globalization, but mitigating its negative consequences.

The purpose of the course is the understanding of the micro and macro implications of the new economy as well as the challenges in the global economic environment. In the context of the course the following issues will be analysed:

  • Globalization: Past and Present – Myths and Realities
  • New pattern of production: Economies of scale derived from the supply and demand side
  • Economies of scale and market structure
  • The future of employment
  • Income and wealth inequalities
  • Competitiveness as the key determinant of prosperity
  • Over-indebtedness of the western economies
  • The value in the digital and network economy and the lack of safe assets
  • Financial crises
  • The importance of liquidity and the limits of quantitative easing
  • Policy dilemmas and efficient functioning of the markets
  • Global imbalances

 

Politics and Modernity: The public sphere in the internet age

The subject-matter of the course focuses on basic concepts of contemporary political philosophy and theory. The notions of modernity and public sphere are essential conceptual axes of the analysis and critical approach of what politics is in modern societies. Moreover, during the course, we examine the influence of new media of communication on communicative systems and the public sphere. Such new media of communication develop within the internet and result in a new political modernity for the 21st century.

 

Politics, Economy and the Society in the “Third World”

This course focuses on the developing world, often described as “Third World”. Through a critical historical and cultural approach, the course attempts to illustrate the criteria and the factors that have impacted its socio-economic evolution. Special attention is paid on the political, economic and social transformation of “Third World” countries through a critical assessment of the theories of modernization, dependency and post-colonialism. The course focuses on two specific geographic regions sharing common characteristics and origins: Latin America and South Asia, emphasizing and interpreting issues such as poverty, underdevelopment, hunger and democratic institutions.

 

Internship

The Internship Program gives the opportunity to students to work for a short period of time in public or private agencies (in Greece or abroad) whose activities are relevant to the Department’s study fields. The program aims at assisting the students to experience how theory translates into practice, that is to say, how their academic capacities and qualifications might be exploited professionally. Overall, the internship program intends to facilitate the students’ accession into the labor market.

 

The Psychology of Revolutions

The course investigates the phenomenon of revolutions from the point of view of political psychology: of the branch of social psychology which focuses on the psychological mechanisms associated to political practices. After an introduction to the general proceedings and methods of political and social psychology, the course will explore the psychological mechanisms that underpin the stability of political regimes and which, under certain conditions produce phenomena of “stasis” and violent constitutional change. These mechanisms constitute the subjective reception of those structural social disfunctions which lead to the growth of collective expectations which cannot be met and the frustration of which is provoking discontent. The psychic factor is analyzed into the desirability of the possibilities of “exit”, of “voice” and “loyalty”, with revolution being the choice of “exit” when “loyalty” recedes under the weight of growing anomy. The establishment of a new political order is examined through the prism of the psychological need of “routinization”.